3 Days in Oslo

When we talk about Norwegians in Sweden, we think of a people who are bursting with health, and who spend any free time that they have outdoors. When my Norwegian friends asked if I brought good walking shoes, I was a little afraid, not knowing what to expect. Their idea of relaxing is skiing, hiking, biking, sailing and anything else that requires some sort of activity.

Oslo is a small city, very easy to get around and see the sights if you are there for the first time. A 10 minute drive will take you up to Holmenkollen, a ski area and the famous Ski Jump. When the snow has disappeared the area is popular with jogging and walking trails.

Oslo, while retaining their beautiful old buildings, have injected a lot of modernity into their city with newly developed areas with very modern architecture. It is a city that continues to grow and has done so successfully without compromising on the quality of life for its residents. The former shipyard of Aker Brygge is today an area of apartment buildings, restaurants and shops on the waterfront. The Astrup Fearnley Museum designed by Renzo Piano showcases an impressive collection of Modern Art, and the building is stunning. Continuing off Aker Brygge into the Oslo Fjord is Tjuvholmen, also featuring newly built apartments and restaurants and Art Galleries. The pedestrian shopping street of Karl Johan Gate leads up the Avenue where the Royal Palace is located. The street also has the Royal Theatre and the Parliament House. The Opera House by the architectural firm Snøhetta is built in an angular form that gives the impression of the building sliding down into the Oslofjord. The exterior in white granite and Italian Marble offers  a large space for people to take in the views, the sloping exterior makes it perfect for skateboarders. What a great urban space is created, the exterior to be enjoyed by everyone. It is a beautiful building with large glass windows and oak panelling inside.

Frogner Park is a large public park where the sculptor Gustav Vigeland installed 212 large bronze and granite sculptures in 1940. The 14 metre high Monolith is striking with 121 figures rising towards the heavens all carved from one piece of granite. It took 14 years for 3 stone carvers to carve out Vigeland’s design.

I couldn’t leave Oslo without going to the Munch Museum. The Museum screens several short films, the one I saw was The Dance of Life by Solvi Lindseth. The film offers a view of Munch from childhood to old age and how events in his life influenced his art and produced the masterworks that we see today.

Here are some impressions of the city.

The Art Nouveau Theatercafeen, opposite the National Theatre is full of charm, and good food.
The Art Nouveau Theatercafeen, opposite the National Theatre is full of charm, and good food.
The bar at the Theatercafeen.
The bar at the Theatercafeen.
The National Theatre at dusk.
The National Theatre at dusk.
The ski jump at Holmenkollen.
The ski jump at Holmenkollen.
View of Oslo from Holmenkollen.
View of Oslo from Holmenkollen.
Frogneseteren Restaurant at Holmenkollen, delicious apple cake.
Frogneseteren Restaurant at Holmenkollen, delicious apple cake.
Viking Ship Museum. 3 Viking ships from the 9th Century AD excavated from Royal Viking burial mounds in the 19th Century.
Viking Ship Museum. 3 Viking ships from the 9th Century AD excavated from Royal Viking burial mounds in the 19th Century.
Frogner Park. The bridge in the centre of the park leads to Vigeland's sculpture installations.
Frogner Park. The bridge in the centre of the park leads to Vigeland’s sculpture installations.
Vigeland's The Angry Boy.
Vigeland’s The Angry Boy.
The Monolith reaching up towards the heavens.
The Monolith reaching up towards the heavens.

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Seated in deep conversation at Aker Brygge.
Seated in deep conversation at Aker Brygge.
Restaurant Lofoten, delicious seafood at Aker Brygge.
Restaurant Lofoten, delicious seafood at Aker Brygge.
The Thief on Tjuvholmen, a hotel with a restaurant and a very chic bar. On the Oslofjord by the Astrup Fearnley Museum.
The Thief on Tjuvholmen, a hotel with a restaurant and a very chic bar. On the Oslofjord by the Astrup Fearnley Museum.
Karl Johan Gate, pedestrian shopping street.
Karl Johan Gate, pedestrian shopping street.
The Opera House.
The Opera House.
The sloping roof of the Opera House
The sloping roof of the Opera House
The wave wall in oak.
The wave wall in oak.
Roof Supports by the artist Olafur Eliasson.
Roof Supports by the artist Olafur Eliasson.
The Munch Museum.
The Munch Museum.
The Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.
The Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art.
Restaurant Onda, surrounded by water views. Good food and ambience, lighting is dimmed at 10pm and D.J plays the music.
Restaurant Onda, surrounded by water views. Good food and ambience, lighting is dimmed at 10pm and D.J plays the music. Aker Brygge.

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Global Nomad living in Stockholm, blogging on Art, Design, Beautiful Interiors and Travel. I have lived in 7 different countries, and travel widely. Love Art and Design especially the Scandinavian aesthetics. My blog features interviews with creative people, many of them top artists and designers from Scandinavia. I also blog on my travels, offering insider tips from my global network.

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